Library

The Amsterdam Museum’s library is geared towards supporting academic research on the collection and preparing exhibitions.

The library also contains a basic collection on the history of Amsterdam. Furthermore, it is home to a number of special collections and extensive documentation on exhibitions.

The museum library can be visited by appointment. Appointments can be made via the Collection Information Desk, which can be reached by telephone between 1 pm and 3 pm on the number below. If you call outside these hours, please leave a message and we will call you back at the earliest opportunity. You can also send an e-mail to the address below. The library does not lend materials.

Contact
T +31 (0)20 5231 760
E infocollectie@amsterdammuseum.nl

Go straight to the online catalogue 

The various collections
History and art history library (approx. 18,000 tapes)
The museum library boasts an impressive collection of books, journals and reference papers on the history of Amsterdam. The basis for this collection was the library of Amsterdam collector Willem Dreesmann, which the City of Amsterdam acquired in its entirety for the museum library in the 1960s. There is also an extensive art history library including, amongst other things, a rich collection of museum catalogues, focusing on the many fields forming the subject of the museum's collections. The library currently aligns its policy with two other libraries that play a key role in studies relating to the history of Amsterdam: the City Archives and the University of Amsterdam.

Museum Willet-Holthuysen (approx. 5000 tapes)
Museum Willet-Holthuysen Is managed by the Amsterdam Museum. Not only was Abraham Willet an important art collector, he also owned an impressive 19th century library with an emphasis on art history. Both this collection and his house at Herengracht 605 were bequeathed to the City of Amsterdam by hiw widow Louisa Willet-Holthuysen in 1895. An significant part of this library is on long-term loan to the Art History Institute in Amsterdam. The remaining part is located in the Museum Willet-Holthuysen.